OSHA’s New Reporting Requirements for Worker Injuries

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued a final rule requiring employers to notify OSHA when an employee is killed on the job or suffers a work-related hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye.

Effective January 1, 2015, employers under federal OSHA jurisdiction must report work-related fatalities within 8 hours, and work-related in-patient hospitalizations, amputations, or losses of an eye within 24 hours.

The new rule also updates the list of employers partially exempt from OSHA record-keeping requirements. Additionally, the rule maintains the exemption for any employer with 10 or fewer employees, regardless of their industry classification, from the requirement to routinely keep records of worker injuries and illnesses.

U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez believes that “[w]orkplace injuries and fatalities are absolutely preventable” and that the new requirements will “hold employers accountable for preventing them.”

All employers covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Act, even those exempt from maintaining injury and illness records, must comply with OSHA’s new severe injury and illness reporting requirements. To assist employers, OSHA is developing a web portal for employers to report incidents online, in addition to the phone reporting options.

Furthermore, OSHA has updated the list of industries that, due to relatively low occupational injury and illness rates, are excluded from the requirement to routinely keep injury and illness records. Any employer with 10 or fewer employees, regardless of their industry classification, is exempt from the recordkeeping rule.

 

Sources: Insurance Journal, U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

September 16th, 2014 by Verity Insurance Services Inc.